Welcome to jdrgaming.com
Monday, November 19 2018 @ 01:48 AM -08

Changes to Minecraft.net

Given the crappy nature of the previous incarnation of minecraft.net, I was thrilled to hear that the site has just been upgraded. Sadly, while the site now works a lot better on mobile devices, the content still falls short.

There's still no obvious indication of the current version, no link to a change log, and the download links are actually buried deeper than before.

So I won't be retiring the JDRGaming Minecraft page any time soon.

Minecraft 1.9.2 released

On March 30, Mojang released Minecraft 1.9.1. Apparently 1.9.1 had major problems, which were quickly fixed, resulting in Minecraft 1.9.2.

The new version adds Elytra audio, which is apparently something exciting, but is a bit of a mystery to me. Maybe I should get on the server more often. There are a few other minor changes, and some improvements were made in server performance.

The JDRGaming Minecraft server is now running version 1.9.2.

You can find all the details on the Minecraft page on this site (jdrgaming.com).

 

Problem with TPU stats

The TPU stats are showing game dates incorrectly. I'm not sure when this started, but since it seems to affect even stats archives from previous years, I'm investigating the PHP component of the stats system.

Hopefully I can fix this problem without losing any stats data, but I can't make any promises right now.

Sorry for any inconvenience.

UPDATE: As of 2016Mar13 11:15am, the problem seems to be resolved.

Minecraft 1.9 released

Minecraft 1.9 was released earlier today by Mojang. The new version fixes a few bugs and adds a bunch of new features related to combat. The JDRGaming Minecraft server is now running version 1.9, and the Minecraft page on this site has been updated with the latest information.

JDRGaming BF2 server now running FH2 version 2.51

Due to problems in the 2.50 release, the FH2 development team released FH2 version 2.51 yesterday.

The JDRGaming BF2 server is now running FH2 2.51. You'll need to run the FH2 2.51 client to play on the JDRGaming server.

The FH2 client launcher should automatically detect the new version and offer to download it.

As always, please let me know if you encounter any problems.

Forgotten Hope 2.5

Forgotten Hope 2, version 2.5 is now available.

I originally planned to spend some time evaluating the new version before upgrading the JDRGaming BF2 server, to make sure that co-op play was possible with the new version's maps. Unfortunately, the master server that was used by FH 2.48 is now permanently offline due to recent Denial of Service (DoS) attacks.

The FH 2.5 launcher and client, as well as the FH 2.5 server files, use a different master server. In order to play Forgotten Hope 2 online, everyone will need to upgrade to version 2.5.

The JDRGaming BF2 server is offline while I upgrade the server. I'll post here when the server is back online.

According to the dedicated folks who work on making FH2 maps work in single player (and co-op) mode, none of the new maps (including the western front maps) work in co-op mode. I'm hoping they find the time to knock those maps into shape, because they look interesting: Arad, Dukla Pass, Pegasus, Sammatus, and Seelow Heights.

Meanwhile, several long-standing, global issues with FH2 co-op have been fixed or limited in the new version. For instance, crashes related to deployed emplacements have been fixed. The release notes have additional details.

You can (and should) download and install the new FH2 client files. Note that the new master server is apparently having some issues and you may have trouble getting it to show any servers. If that happens, try using the FH2 web site's server browser to find and join a server.

Yet another example of the pointlessness of DRM

In the long, sad history of DRM (Digital Rights Management), also known as copy protection, there are countless examples that demonstrate its futility. The latest is courtesy of Bandai-Namco, producers of the console game 'Tales of Symphonia', originally released for Nintendo Gamecube in 2004.

The PC port of this old console game is a complete mess. But rather than spend some money to fix bugs, Bandai-Namco decided to waste money adding copy protection to the game. Because that's the default position of the corporate drones and lawyers who run most game companies these days. If they had stopped to consider this for a few microseconds, they would have realized that any potential profit they might lose to piracy is vastly outweighed by the bad reviews and angry customers with which they are now faced.

What's that definition of insanity? Doing the same thing over and over again, expecting a different outcome but never getting it? Bandai-Namco, you are insane.